SOME TERMINOLOGIES USED IN PLASMODIUM INFECTION

  • Sporozoite: Sporozoite is the infectious form of Plasmodium parasite, which is injected into humans by the bite of female Anopheles
  • Merozoite: Merozoite is the form of the Plasmodium parasite that invades the red blood cells immediately after its release from the rupturing of schizonts in the liver cells.
  • Oocyst: Oocyst is a stage of the Plasmodium parasite which is produced when male and female gametes combine within the mosquito.
  • Gametes: Gametes are the reproductive elements of the Plasmodium parasite, and it is made up of the male and female forms.
  • Gametocytes: Gametocytes are the precursors of the sexual forms of Plasmodium parasite, which are released as either male or female gametes within the gut or stomach of the mosquito.
  • Microgametocytes: Microgametocytes are the male gametes of the Plasmodium
  • Macrogametocytes: Macrogametocytes are the female gametes of the Plasmodium
  • Haploid: Haploid cells are cells that contain a half set of the entire Plasmodium parasite chromosomes.
  • Ookinete: Ookinete is the actively moving zygote form of the Plasmodium parasite that enters the stomach of the female Anopheles mosquito to form an oocyst under the outer lining of the mosquitoes’ gut. Ookinete is the zygote that is motile.
  • Diploid: Diploid cells are cells that contain a full set of the Plasmodium parasite
  • Zygote: Zygote is the diploid cell formed when the male gamete (microgametocyte) and a female gamete (macrogametocyte) fuse or join together.

REFERENCES

World Health Organization. World Malaria Report 2009. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2009. Available at http://www.who.int/malaria/world_malaria_report_2009/en/index.html. Accessed January 04, 2014.

Taylor LH, Latham SM, Woolhouse ME (2001). Risk factors for disease emergence. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci, 356:983–989.

Stedman’s medical dictionary, 27th edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins.

Steketee R.W, Campbell C.C (2010). Impact of national malaria control scale-up programmes in Africa: magnitude and attribution of effects. Malar J, 9:299.

Snow R.W, Guerra C.A, Noor A.M, Myint H.Y and Hay S.I (2005). The global distribution of clinical episodes of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Nature, 434:214-217.

Snow R.W, Trape J.F and Marsh K (2001). The past, present and future of childhood malaria mortality in Africa. Trends Parasitol, 17:593-597.

Schneider M.J (2011). Introduction to Public Health. Third edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Sudbury, Massachusetts, USA.

Gillespie S.H and Pearson R.D (2001). Principles and Practice of Clinical Parasitology. John Wiley and Sons Ltd. West Sussex, England.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *